My work, My Inspiration, & Things That I Love

Bringing beauty to the closets of costume enthusiasts around the world, Redthreaded is a one-woman costume and fashion business specializing in historical pieces, corsetry, and the occasional avant-garde. ++++++++++ redthreaded.com redthreaded.etsy.com zibbet.com/redthreaded facebook.com/redthreaded cynthiasettje.com
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From the V&A Collections

Stays circa 1660-1680
"Materials & Making The stays are made by hand-stitching the watered silk to a layer of linen in long narrow pockets. Thin strips of whalebone are inserted into the pockets to give the stays their shape. Whalebone is in fact not bone, but cartilage from the mouth of the baleen whale. It grows in large sheets in the mouth of the whale and serves as a kind of sieve to filter out tiny krill, the whale’s primary source of food, from the seawater. Commercial whaling began in the early 17th century in the North Sea and quickly spread to the waters around Greenland and eventually to the Bering Seas as the whales were hunted almost to extinction. Baleen was used for women’s stays and hoops as well as a wide variety of other items such as riding crops, whips, brushes, chair backs and bottoms, carriage springs and fishing rods. Whale blubber was rendered into oil and used for lighting. Whalebone was the preferred stiffener for stays because it was firm enough to hold the shape, yet flexible enough not to break when the wearer moved. The ribbons retain their original points, the narrow metal clamps at the ends. They prevent the ribbon from unravelling and help to thread it through the lacing holes. The points are made of tinned iron; normally they would have rusted away.”

http://collections.vam.ac.uk/item/O10446/stays-and-busk-unknown/

From the V&A Collections

Stays circa 1660-1680

"Materials & Making
The stays are made by hand-stitching the watered silk to a layer of linen in long narrow pockets. Thin strips of whalebone are inserted into the pockets to give the stays their shape. Whalebone is in fact not bone, but cartilage from the mouth of the baleen whale. It grows in large sheets in the mouth of the whale and serves as a kind of sieve to filter out tiny krill, the whale’s primary source of food, from the seawater. Commercial whaling began in the early 17th century in the North Sea and quickly spread to the waters around Greenland and eventually to the Bering Seas as the whales were hunted almost to extinction. Baleen was used for women’s stays and hoops as well as a wide variety of other items such as riding crops, whips, brushes, chair backs and bottoms, carriage springs and fishing rods. Whale blubber was rendered into oil and used for lighting. Whalebone was the preferred stiffener for stays because it was firm enough to hold the shape, yet flexible enough not to break when the wearer moved. The ribbons retain their original points, the narrow metal clamps at the ends. They prevent the ribbon from unravelling and help to thread it through the lacing holes. The points are made of tinned iron; normally they would have rusted away.”

http://collections.vam.ac.uk/item/O10446/stays-and-busk-unknown/

tiny-librarian:

Edward VI, Henry VIII’s son by his third wife, Jane Seymour, was Henry’s only legitimate male child to survive infancy. This is a copy of a portrait painted shortly before Edward became king at the age of nine. Portraits were often copied as monarchs sat to be painted only rarely. Wealthy families hung portraits of members of the Tudor dynasty in their homes to show their loyalty.
Source

tiny-librarian:

Edward VI, Henry VIII’s son by his third wife, Jane Seymour, was Henry’s only legitimate male child to survive infancy. This is a copy of a portrait painted shortly before Edward became king at the age of nine. Portraits were often copied as monarchs sat to be painted only rarely. Wealthy families hung portraits of members of the Tudor dynasty in their homes to show their loyalty.

Source

redthreadedcostumes:

For about one hour a day, this little corner of my apartment gets perfect Dutch Master-esque light. Great for showing off a new set of Redthreaded 17th Century Stays, a new pattern/design which will be offered later this year for custom order.

Linen fashion fabric, coutil and twill interior, reed boning with a few steels, and hand bound eyelets.

I’ll be making these stays available for custom order in my Redthreaded Etsy shop this evening! If you’ve had a hard time finding historical reproduction Cavalier era 17th century stays, this may be your lucky day.

This will be the scene in my studio on Tuesday! Time to #restock #redthreaded #corsets #bustles and make new things. What new corset style would you like to see introduced in August? #costume #historicalfashion #periodcostume #corsetmaking #underpinnings #corsets #authenticcorset #regency #georgian #marieantoinette #janeausten #reenactment #corsetsforsale #designerlife #sewing #smallbusiness #selfemployment #etsyseller

This will be the scene in my studio on Tuesday! Time to #restock #redthreaded #corsets #bustles and make new things. What new corset style would you like to see introduced in August? #costume #historicalfashion #periodcostume #corsetmaking #underpinnings #corsets #authenticcorset #regency #georgian #marieantoinette #janeausten #reenactment #corsetsforsale #designerlife #sewing #smallbusiness #selfemployment #etsyseller

Get ready. #redthreaded will be accepting #custom orders again in two weeks! Your fabric, color,size, design, etc! #customorders #etsyseller #corsetmaker #corsetier #korsett #marieantoinette #georgian #periodcostume #cosplay #bespoke #fashion #designerlife #igfashion #sewing #couturesewing #madetoorder #costume #historicalcostume #reenactment #costumecon

Get ready. #redthreaded will be accepting #custom orders again in two weeks! Your fabric, color,size, design, etc! #customorders #etsyseller #corsetmaker #corsetier #korsett #marieantoinette #georgian #periodcostume #cosplay #bespoke #fashion #designerlife #igfashion #sewing #couturesewing #madetoorder #costume #historicalcostume #reenactment #costumecon

kurvendiskussionen:

thelingerieaddict:

The Corset’s Effect

Photo Credits: 

1. corset, 1750-75, from Metropolitan Museum of Art | Portrait of Grand Duchess Maria Fiodorovna by Alexander Roslin, 1777

2. corset, 1839-41, from Metropolitan Museum of Art | Marquise de Béthisy as Orientalin, 1833

3. corset, 1810-50, from Metropolitan Museum of Art | Portrait of Charlotte and Elizabeth Sullivan, daughters of Sir Richard Sullivanby Reinagle Ramsay Richard, 1810

4. corset, 1909, from Metropolitan Museum of Art | photograph, c. 1910-13

5. corset, by Maison Léoty, 1891, from Metropolitan Museum of Art | A Bar at the Folies-Bergere by Edouard Manet, 1882

6. corset, c. 1876, from Metropolitan Museum of Art | On the Thames by James Tissot, c. 1874

7. corset, by Worcester Corset Company, c. 1898, from Metropolitan Museum of Art | Mrs. Ralph Curtis by John Singer Sargent, 1898

Please don’t remove the credits. 

(via little-miss-sew-and-sew)

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